Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Facebook0Email this to someone

One of the steel industries affected by Chinese activity in scrap – now and in future – is that of Pakistan. At the moment it’s a benefit as scrap imports have recently supported production growth. But it’s anyone’s guess as to how this relationship will develop as China makes decisions on what to do with its scrap. In the run up to their September conference SteelMint has published this interview with Mr Khurram Javaid, CEO at Mughal Iron & Steel Industries, one of Pakistan’s largest steel producers at 1.1 million tonnes and also one of the largest steel scrap importers.

 

 

{ 0 comments }

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Facebook0Email this to someone

Based on reported import licenses, US flat steel products imports fell 3% from 1,057,000 short tons in June to 1,028,000 tons in July. Flat products imports for the first seven months of 2017 were flat compared to the same period last year. However, comparing the first seven months of 2016 with 2017 by product, cut plate imports fell 43%, hot roll imports were down 20%, cold rolled imports rose 35% and hot dip galvanized imports increased 25%.

SIMA US flat products import licenses and actuals
January 2013 to July 2017

short tons


Photo by The Theis Group (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

{ 0 comments }

China ferrous scrap growth

by James Moss on August 3, 2017

in Data

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Facebook0Email this to someone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The generation and disposition of Chinese ferrous scrap is going to be one of the most important and dynamic factors in the Asian and wider steel industry development over the next decade. We’re interested in any information or analysis that will help us understand how that development is likely to occur and particularly whether China is to become a net consumer or supplier of scrap. There’s going to be a lot of it. If it’s consumed in China, China will undergo a significant change in its steel production base (and its steel industry employment). If it’s consumed outside of China, its availability will impact investment decisions across the region (and elsewhere) about how to form front ends.

SteelMint is hosting a conference in Bangkok in September that will address this and other issues important to the region. The graphic above is part of an interesting SteelMint blog post that begins the discussion of Chinese scrap growth. The post itself can be reached here.

 

 

 

{ 0 comments }

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Facebook0Email this to someone

AK Steel, ArcelorMittal, and US Steel released Q2 2017 earnings and the results have been entered in the spreadsheet behind the graph below. AK’s and ArcelorMittal’s EBITDA per ton were virtually unchanged from the first quarter of this year. AK’s dropped slightly to $115 from $118 and ArcelorMittal’s fell to $93 from $94. US Steel, on the other hand, achieved a substantial increase in EBITDA per ton, from $18 in Q1 to $90 in Q2.

{ 0 comments }

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Facebook0Email this to someone

Worldsteel reported Chinese crude steel production at 73.2 million metric tonnes in June, 5.7% higher than in June 2016. Chinese crude output for the first six months of 2017 was 4.2% higher than in the same period last year.

Chinese net finished steel exports (exports minus imports) in June were 5.7 million tonnes, 42.0% lower than in June 2016. Chinese net finished steel exports over the first six months of 2017 were 32.7% lower than in the first six months of 2016.

China monthly crude steel production
January 2006 to June 2017, thousand metric tonnes


Photo by IvanWalsh.com [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

{ 0 comments }

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Facebook0Email this to someone

The second quarter earnings season has begun and so far we have results from four steel companies tracked by the Nerds. Two companies achieved higher EBITDA per ton in the second quarter as compared to the first quarter: CMC’s EBITDA per ton rose to $97 from $83 and SSAB’s jumped to $135 from $94. The other two companies that reported saw a slight decline in EBITDA per ton in the quarter: Nucor’s fell to $114 from $124 and SDI’s fell to $140 from $165. Stay tuned as more results will be coming soon.

{ 0 comments }